Archive

Below is a selection of International and National Exhibitions from 2010-2019.


2019

‘Rediscovered’ A Collection of Landscapes . Linton and Kay Galleries West Perth

Jacinda creates a diverse collection of landscapes that question the accuracy of memory. Colour plays an integral part in her work,  rich layers of oil paint illuminate the canvas and  draw the viewer to look  beyond triggering thoughts of belonging and a sense of place.  Bayne wants us to connect and reconnect by using our memory and imagination by using familiar forms and colours found in the landscape.  She is interested and Inspired by how we understand and interact with our surroundings and how it makes us feel, forming strong bonds to the land and with each other.

2018

‘Familiar Land’ . Studio Gallery . Yallingup

 Familiar Land, Jacinda extends her innate connection with nature, rekindling memories and feelings evoked by the natural landscape. 

These seemingly ambiguous landscapes are a cognitive representation of her identity. Bodies of water and reflections feature prominently and stimulate intimate memories, intending to remind the observer of previous experiences and their natural human need to connect and re-connect with the landscape.

“When you think of your land and where you are from, you think of the topography of the place, what it looks like. Subconsciously, you think of the light, the colours, the climate and the terrain. It stimulates an essential human need – a sense of belonging.”

This collection of vibrant, yet subtle, oil paintings are the result of a process unique to Jacinda. The building up and taking away of numerous layers of thin glazes of rich pigment delivers a luminous quality to the surface. Her colour palette is somehow calming and energising at the same time. This,  combined with the sheer scale of the large canvasses (some up to 2 metres in size), allow you to truly immerse yourself in the work and transport you to a place you once knew.

2017

Merging Landscapes’ . Anderson Contemporary . New York City

West Australian Artist Jacinda Bayne invites us to pause. Merging Landscapes provides a space for the viewer to breathe and to take time to reflect upon personal experiences. These large scale, evocative canvases are a fusion of experiences, memories and thoughts – light filtering through trees and water, suspended in time. Open fields of color, smooth gradients of blues/turquoise, familiar landforms, a clearing in a forest and calm waters reflect the world above and below. 

Colour is always an integral part of the process which evokes emotion toward what we are seeing. Glazes of oil paint fall into considered areas and pathways. The work is smooth, fluid and rich in pigment. Seemingly accidental runs of paint are expertly controlled and purposely placed to lead the eye through the composition. The scale of the works intend to allow the viewer to immerse themselves within the work and quieten the noise of the outside world. Carefully placed, bridges, trees and bodies of water all elicit quietude and reflection.  Inspired by natural beauty, Jacinda returns to her collection of sketches, photographs and paint palettes, where the endless combinations of colours create an internal dialogue. Her combination of colour, light and imagery trigger one’s own sense of place.

To be in the moment within these sublime and enchanted spaces is where the artist wants us to be. Frozen waterfalls, fire flies and shards of light are some of the visual triggers merged into these works below the surface of rich transparent color. One can stand on the water’s edge and gaze through the trees on to its unattainable beauty. In the hustle of New York City, Jacinda draws us in to windows of imagination, reflection and personal space. These ambiguous landscapes provide an opportunity to dream, be in the moment, connect and belong.

2015

‘Records’ . PSAS . Fremantle.

Bayne uses standard sized bowls to mix colour and glazes to create her evocative paintings. These objects have taken a life on their own and have become a natural extension of her two dimensional work. Bayne will create a carefully orchestrated installation of some 300 of these colour vessels for the ground floor gallery at PS Art Space. Representing a living record of her process as a painter, the receptacles take centre stage by transcending their mere utilitarian function into a work of art in their own right. Bayne manages to evoke visual poetry through thoughtful colour arrangement and provide the viewer with a scale immersion into her alchemical process.

2014

‘Landscape and Memory’ . Linton and Kay Galleries . Perth

Her most recent exhibition, Landscape and Memory, explores the relationship between memory and place, transporting the viewer to another, perhaps familiar, place and time.

“Rather than a reality of location, this new collection aims to instill a sense of place. I wanted to broaden my visual language of colour and love of landscape to inspire the viewer to connect through common emotional experience and remind them of a certain time in their lives,” said Bayne.

Instead of relying on sketches, photographs and studies from her travels, Bayne allows her imagination and memory to inform her works.

explores the relationship between memory and place, transporting the viewer to another, perhaps familiar, place and time.

“Rather than a reality of location, this new collection aims to instill a sense of place.

“I wanted to broaden my visual language of colour and love of landscape to inspire the viewer to connect through common emotional experience and remind them of a certain time in their lives,” said Bayne.

Instead of relying on sketches, photographs and studies from her travels, Bayne allows her imagination and memory to inform her works.

Floating Tree‘ – Linton and Kay Galleries. 2010

On a mineral Lake in Jiuzhaigou, China a UNESCO World Heritage site, award winning landscape artist Jacinda Bayne discovered a floating tree. Young and unassuming the tree had grown from the collapsed remains of a dead tree lying in the lake. Its beauty and overwhelming determination to grow inspired Bayne’s latest body of work ‘The Floating Tree’.

2011

‘Where The Water Talks’ – Linton and Kay Galleries

“Go ask those fellas what they call those talking water places” was a statement that resonated with Jacinda Bayne whilst discussing her latest collection of work with friend and Aboriginal Artist Toogarr Morrison.

“I was searching for the one common thread that tied my narrative of thoughts, experiences and emotions together and Toogarr helped me realise it” said the 2011 Mandjar Art Award winner. Immediately she knew that her experience had been one shaped and formed by water and it’s effect on the Kimberley.

Artist in Residence onboard the True North, Jacinda was inspired by the huge tidelines, majestic waterfalls and the way the water flowed over the ancient land forms. 

This translated in her studio with her use of rich, intense colours and thin glazes of paint, watching it run over the surface of the canvas like the water to create energy and movement. 

“Colour , I believe creates emotion, and touches all of us. I try to devise a language through colour in which everyone can connect in some way. When the viewer gets that connection, I feel I have achieved what I set out to do.”

“Where the Water Talks” is a collection of vibrant, bold and evocative works of the stunning Kimberley coast , seen through the eyes of this very passionate and dedicated artist.

In A Different Light‘ – Linton and Kay Galleries 2010

This body of work is a representation of my first experience of the Pilbara.

I enjoy watching the sun rise and set, it gives me a sense of being. I was fortunate enough to be able to spend full days within this visually stunning landscape, finding refuge from the searing midday heat down in the shade of these amazing gorges.

I found the ever-changing light and temperature a constant and inspiring challenge. With sketches and watercolours, I tried to capture the way the sun hid behind this massive landscape and the way it’s light cast colour, shape and reflections on the ancient rock formations and it’s waterways. These immediate interpretations were essential for me to use as a reference when I returned to my studio, as they expressed my immediate thoughts of the place, and my inspiration to paint it.

My relationship with landscape gives me a continual passion to solve the endless challenges and issues of composition and colour.

Returning to my studio, I feel my use of oil paint as a medium plays an important part in the work. As it moves on the canvas through my use of numerous glazes, there is the opportunity for reflection and experimentation. This is what drives me. This keeps me, and the work, alive as I make my creative decisions.

I want the viewer to have the opportunity to see something new each time they look at my work. I see things in a different light.

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